Taking Turtles from the Wild

Taking turtles from the wild
Turtles and tortoise should not be taken from the wild for the following
reasons:
1. Over-collection leads to the demise of wild populations
2. Mal adaptation
3. Spread of disease to existing captive bred turtles.
Over-collection
Turtles in the wild are already suffering from pollution and habitat loss.
Taking them out of the wild puts additional pressure on wild populations.
When you take a turtle from the wild you are not only removing a single
turtle, but their offspring and their offspring’s offspring. Every turtle counts!
Over collection can lead to eventual extinction.
Mal adaptation
Turtles taken from the wild may never adjust to life in captivity. Imagine
having the ability to roam where you choose and hunt for food in a huge area
then being placed in a small container. Any container would be small to a wild
caught turtle. This would be like us living in the bathroom of our home as
opposed to the entire house.
Many wild-caught turtles will not recognize a food source you are providing.
Pellets and commercially prepared diets are not something they have seen
before.
Disease
Wild-caught turtles can spread disease to captive bred turtles. This can be
proliferated from cramped quarters. Remember, before their capture they
were able to move around at will.
Exceptions to taking turtles from the wild include non-native species or
injured animals.
Occasionally a captive turtle or tortoise may escape their enclosure or be
released by a well intentioned owner. If you find a turtle or tortoise the
correct step is to make a positive identification. Many times I have been
brought sulcata tortoises found walking down the road. If you find a turtle or
tortoise that is not native to your state, contact a local herpetological
association for guidance.
Injured Chelonians
As habitat is lost more and more wild turtles are being pushed into areas they
would normally not call home.
Over developing has given rise to the number of road causalities. If you find
a turtle or tortoises that has been injured get it to a rehabber ASAP.
Where to Get Turtles and Tortoises
There are many places to acquire turtles and tortoises to keep as pets. Some
of these places include rescues that focus on re homing chelonians. Breeders are another great place to acquire a captive turtle or tortoise.
If you find a turtle or tortoise please leave it alone unless it is a non-native
species, or it is injured. If the chelonian is injured please contact a wildlife
rehabber.
Turtles and tortoise should not be taken from the wild for the following
reasons:
1. Over-collection leads to the demise of wild populations
2. Mal adaptation
3. Spread of disease to existing captive bred turtles.
Over-collection
Turtles in the wild are already suffering from pollution and habitat loss.
Taking them out of the wild puts additional pressure on wild populations.
When you take a turtle from the wild you are not only removing a single
turtle, but their offspring and their offspring’s offspring. Every turtle counts!
Over collection can lead to eventual extinction.
Mal adaptation
Turtles taken from the wild may never adjust to life in captivity. Imagine
having the ability to roam where you choose and hunt for food in a huge area
then being placed in a small container. Any container would be small to a wild
caught turtle. This would be like us living in the bathroom of our home as
opposed to the entire house.
Many wild-caught turtles will not recognize a food source you are providing.
Pellets and commercially prepared diets are not something they have seen
before.
Disease
Wild-caught turtles can spread disease to captive bred turtles. This can be
proliferated from cramped quarters. Remember, before their capture they
were able to move around at will.
Exceptions to taking turtles from the wild include non-native species or
injured animals.
Occasionally a captive turtle or tortoise may escape their enclosure or be
released by a well intentioned owner. If you find a turtle or tortoise the
correct step is to make a positive identification. Many times I have been
brought sulcata tortoises found walking down the road. If you find a turtle or
tortoise that is not native to your state, contact a local herpetological
association for guidance.
Injured Chelonians
As habitat is lost more and more wild turtles are being pushed into areas they
would normally not call home.
Over developing has given rise to the number of road causalities. If you find
a turtle or tortoises that has been injured get it to a rehabber ASAP.
Where to Get Turtles and Tortoises
There are many places to acquire turtles and tortoises to keep as pets. Some
of these places include rescues that focus on re homing chelonians. Breeders are another great place to acquire a captive turtle or tortoise.
If you find a turtle or tortoise please leave it alone unless it is a non-native
species, or it is injured. If the chelonian is injured please contact a wildlife
rehabber.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *