How Did Czechoslovakia Feel About The Munich Agreement

An agreement was reached on 29 September and.m on 30 September 1938, Adolf Hitler, Neville Chamberlain, Benito Mussolini and Edouard Daladier signed the Munich Agreement. The agreement was officially put in place by Mussolini, while the Italian plan was almost identical to Godesberg`s proposal: the German army was to complete the occupation of the Sudetenland by 10 October and an international commission should decide the future of other controversial territories. Since most of the border areas are in the area ceded under the Munich Agreement, the rest of Czechoslovakia, despite its relatively large reserves of modern armaments, was totally open to further invasions. In a speech to the Reichstag, Hitler spoke of the importance of the occupation for the strengthening of the German army and said: That Germany, occupying Czechoslovakia, won 2,175 rifles and cannons, 469 tanks, 500 pieces of anti-aircraft artillery, 43,000 machine guns, 1,090,000 military rifles, 114,000 pistols, about one billion small arms and three million rounds of ammunition. This could arm about half of the Wehrmacht. [93] Czechoslovakian weapons later played an important role in the German conquest of Poland and France, the latter of which had pushed Czechoslovakia to capitulate to the Sudetenland in 1938. On his way back from Munich, Chamberlain told an excited crowd at Heston airport: “It is peace for our time” and he praised the agreement he had signed with Hitler. This was the culmination of the policy of appeasement. Six months later, Hitler stopped his promises and ordered his armies to invade Prague. Within a year, Britain and France were at war with Germany. The Czechoslovakians were appalled by the colony of Munich. They were not invited to the conference and felt betrayed by the British and French governments. Many Czechs and Slovaks describe the Munich agreement as a Munich diktat (Czech: Mnichovska diktéta); in Slovak: Mnechovska diktét).

The phrase “Munich betrayal” (Czech: Mnichovska zrada; In Slovak: Mnechovska zrada) is also used because Czechoslovakia`s military alliance with France proved useless. This is also reflected in the fact that the French government, in particular, had considered that Czechoslovakia would be held responsible for any European war that would result if the Czechoslovak Republic defended itself by force against German abuses. In 1938, the Soviet Union was allied with France and Czechoslovakia.

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